REVIEW by Trish: Stained Glass Shards by Rosemary Rey (@rosereywriter)

Stained Glass ShardsElyce Fielding has cut ties with her college friend turned lover, Griffin Belanger. After three months without communication, Griffin is back in Boston for the premiere of his latest film. Elyce shuts herself in her studio apartment, preventing any sightings of the famous man she is deeply in love with. Following an unsatisfactory meal without dessert, Elyce goes to bed thinking she survived the night without a visit from Griffin. When he knocks on her door for a rendezvous, Elyce could not turn him away.

After one last tryst, Elyce decides she can no longer continue their sexual relationship. For months, Elyce works on her personal growth by losing weight, changing her style, and publishing her first novel set to become a feature film. While traveling in California with her new lover and agent, Ritter Thorman, Elyce has a chance encounter with Griffin. Griffin vows to win her back by any means possible. Elyce must choose between her first love or her attentive lover.

 

RELEASED FEBRUARY 2016!

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KEEP READING FOR MORE INFO ABOUT THE BOOK
AND TO READ TRISH’S REVIEW!

 

Stained Glass Shards
by Rosemary Rey

Series
n/a; standalone

Genre
Adult
Women’s Fiction

Publisher
Independent

Publication Date
February 10, 2016

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Stained Glass Shards is a story of personal growth and strife. Elyce drops Griffin when she realizes he will never give her what she wants and is only using her, but Griffin doesn’t see it that way. When he runs into her again months after the break-up, he’s certain she’ll come running back. She doesn’t, but he’s not giving up.

This is an incredibly well-told story. Elyce is a complex woman, recovering from an extremely unhealthy relationship. She’s strong, but it’s a recent development. Griffin’s reappearance and subsequent pursuit threaten everything she’s done for herself and her future since they parted.

As for Griffin, this is one of those books where you get into the head of the antagonist as well. It’s obvious from the beginning that he wants Elyce, that he may even love her, but as the story unfolds, he begins to understand and accept that not all of what Elyce has been telling him was wrong. That doesn’t stop him from being an utter tool, though.

I really love the little excerpts from Elyce’s book. They’re used to provide backstory, set the emotional stage for her re-encounter with Griffin, and delve into the reasons behind their split. They’re also a bit more along the lines of the level of detail I prefer in an intimate scene in that they aren’t all that detailed at all, but instead focus on the emotions, the dynamics of the relationship. Just enough.

I can’t really say that about the downright racy scenes between Ritter and Elyce. Nothing is left to imagination, and they get together a lot. A lot. Those parts read like erotica, but there’s just so much real story around them, that I don’t think the book classifies as that. It’s really a fantastic read. But yes, this is definitely for adults.

Overall, I loved this book. It’s an erotic, romantic story of personal growth and redemption, highlighting the difference between functional and dysfunctional love. I’d highly recommend it to folks who want something other than the traditional soppy romance, something with more meat.

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Trish Finished

The review copy of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

 

About Rosemary Rey

Rosemary Rey left her law practice to write after rediscovering Romance, Erotica, and Contemporary Women’s Fiction. Her most favorite story lines contain plot twists and cliffhangers.

To learn more about Rosemary Rey, join her Newsletter at, http://www.rosemaryrey.com/#!newsletter/l59sp

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